Scenic USA - Arizona

Scenic USA offers a collection of select photographs from a wide variety of attractions, points of interest, historic sites, state and
national parks found throughout the United States. Each photo feature is coupled with a brief explanation.
For further detailed information, links to other related sites are provided.

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Pete's Gas Station

Pete's Gas Station Museum

Photo by Bob Goldman

     The idea of a super highway, connecting Chicago with Los Angeles, first surfaced in the early 1900s. One of the first sections of the famed Route 66 linked Williams, Arizona, with the remainder of America in 1926. Temporarily sidetracked during the beginning of the Great Depression, thousands of men found employment completing the 2,400 mile highway. The super highway quickly gained a reputation as the road to freedom. In no time, countless motels, service stations and diners sprouted up along the roadside. It was John Steinbeck that proclaimed it the Mother Road in his novel, Grapes of Wrath. In the 1960s, Route 66 songs and a television series entertained all of America.
      Williams not only saw the beginning of the historic highway, the town also witnessed its end. Route 66 was officially removed from the U.S. Highway System in 1985, replaced by Interstate highways.
      Somehow the spirit of Route 66 lives on. Baby boomers, looking to experience the old route as their parents and grandparents, have inspired some states to renew the Route 66 signage. Southern California has designated some portions of the road SR 66.
      Pete's Gas Station, pictured here, is one of the nostalgic remnants of the historic route. Here in Williams, the museum houses a collection of gas station memorabilia, including old gas pumps, vintage oil cans and this late 40s classic Ford sedan.


 

 

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